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. it was a couple of days' ride from monticello to washington. he stopped at an inn and falls into a conversation with a fellow guest and they have a lovely, wide ranging discussion the next morning the other guest mr. jefferson is up and out and the other guest had never called his name and he said to the inn keeper who was that and he said who did you think it was? for a while and you knew so much about medicine i thought he was a doctor. then we talked about theology and he seemed as though he might be a priest though a shaky one. i thought he could have been certainly a farmer because of everything he knew and he said i thought you knew mr. jefferson. he was a master of so many different worlds and he was indefinitely curious at the time when human curiosity and the ability to lead us to our own destiny to fulfil in many ways our greatest potentials to discover, to explore was new in the world and this was the enlightened era. they had been a day before yesterday. for the first time ever, priestley and princely authority was in the dhaka, and jefferson was there to reap the harvest of the shi
from both france and in washington sent a telegram to the embassies, which is not far away and i might telegram there was a message from kissinger, secretary of the state department, telling us the israelis, wait. hold your horses. do not take action because kissinger is going to move on with provided doctors. when the telegram was sent from the state department to the embassy during yom kippur, the egyptian and syrian armies were already on their way to destroy the jewish state. that is an example of a mistake because the leader at the time, she was afraid to take a preemptive attack. she was afraid to hold the reserve because she said i don't know what will be the reaction in washington. and dr. kissinger was very strong. nixon was going down, he was going up and she was afraid from his reaction. because of her approach, we almost lost the world. that is why today we do with the issue of iran, we have to take the decision which is good for israel. maybe it will not be popular in the u.n. for sure. everything you say about israel and the standard of the one sponsored by u.s. money of
the military option. shriver opposed this reordering of priorities, generating the observation in washington and elsewhere, quote: like the poor, we have shriver always with us, end of quote. nevertheless, between 1964 and 1968 one-third of america's poor moved upward out of poverty. by the spring of 1968, tension over the budget priorities led shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in stormy chicago, shriver's name again came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on a flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family, still grieving from the recent death of robert, raised an objection in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success in repairing the alliance with france weakened birdies agreement about the vietnam -- by disagreement about the vietnam war, had prompted president pix son to retain him -- nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when democratic nominee george mcgove
here in the washington, d.c. and works in treasury can attend one of his father's talks. and i didn't even make him buy the book, which -- [laughter] is the key. i'm particularly proud of scott, and just want to say that. and i look around the room, there are some other good friends including my oldest friend and college roommate, it's just really great just to see so many people here. so i've got 30 minutes, 30, 35 minutes. because what i've learned is, and this is difficult to only speak for 35 minutes on a book because, first of all, professors are programmed to talk at 45-minute intervals. i'm not sure i can do anything in 30 minutes, but i really do try because often times the questions are really the best part. and your questions will allow me to either follow up on areas that i maybe didn't cover, or if i don't like the question, i'll just talk about whatever i want. which, you know, the presidential candidates can do it, i am entitled to do that as well. [laughter] so i want to talk to you about what this book is and what this book is not. i want to introduce you, particular
about libya and what assumptions people were making. you know, it seemed like washington, between the the white house and state department, everybody had an idea of what should be done, advocatings on both sides, a ready group of the individuals, the power, and given rise to those looking for an opportunity to implement a responsibility to protect scenario that would succeed so that's a whole, you know, that's a whole section, again, as to what -- how did we come to intervene, and why was that actually a good idea? the next question, of course, is the one that everybody's talking about now, which i'll leave teem for questions, which is where is libya headed next? you know, with regards to what happens this benghazi, i think one needs to take -- regardless of all of the chaos that's happening, step back, go up several thousand feet, and look at the process over a microphone longer period of time. this is, you know, we're still a year into the revolution. nobody really expected -- many libyans expected this is going to be a shorter and more pleasant experience than it has been, and
are making. it seemed like washington, everybody had a different idea of what should be done, and there were advocates on both sides, are ready group of individuals who wanted to up look for an opportunity to implement irresponsible protect some area that would succeed. so that is the whole section. this section again as to the how we came to intervene and why that was actually good idea. the next question, of course, is the one everyone is talking about now on which will leave more for questions. where is libya headed next. you know, i think with regard to what happened in and gusty, it is still -- i think everyone needs to take, regardless of all the chaos that is happening, step back, go up several thousand feet and looked at this process over a much longer not the time. we are still a year into this revolution. no one really expects. the many expected that this was going to be a shorter and more pleasant experience that has been, and there have been confrontations a very rude realities, but at the same time in my trips back to the libya over the last year, i've seen similar remarkable st
powell of the supreme court. was a lawyer and was planning to do that for my career in washington. was plucked to be general counsel of the parent company of abc back in 81. i did that for a few years. through a roundabout way i ended up becoming president of abc news. it's not something i ever saw to do. even when what to do it i did it because we need secession plant because we needed secession plan and his i thought i would do it for a couple of years. the biggest surprise was that came to absolutely love it. i've met some wonderful jobs. i've been very blessed, but been any news organization like abc news, much less running it is a rare privilege. that's part of the reason i wrote the book is, people have not had that experience, some sense what it is like. >> how do you get to go to the supreme court? what was that process? what did you learn at the supreme court that helped you run abc? >> as i said it went to michigan undergraduate, and sort of wandered into the law. i was fortunate because is a great law school. like the one you have here at university of texas, austin. i
. now, in some jurisdictions, like washington, dc, you cannot even make that argument. washington, dc, the jurisdiction that has the "just words" doctrine, and the law says no matter what the word, no matter what somebody calls you, that's no excuse for using violence. but other jurisdictions say, we'll let you make that argument to a jury. >> host: professor kennedy, you write in the n-word book, there's nothing necessarily wrong with a white person saying the n-word, just as there is nothing necessarily wrong with a black person saying it. what should matter is the context in which the word is spoken. the speaker's aims, effects, alternative, to condemn whites to use the n-word without regard to context is simply to make a fettish of the word. >> guest: yes. the best example to illustrate that point is mark mark twain'st novel, huckleberry finn. anythinger appears in that book over 200 times. i think huckleberry finn is a wonderful novel and its impulse is antiracist. antislavery, obviously over the years there have been many people who wanted the book banned or wanted to erase the
," which is a classic of washington, i think, no one should go to washington without reading that book. [laughter] max boot, in the times when laws and rules and principles of strategy seem to be overwhelmed or out of date, he's become thee authoritative voice on military affairs always with amazing, consistent, unquestioned integrity, which is also kind of a rarity in the field which is marked often by to littization, and we are looking forward to more work. jay, who i just met a moment ago, i think we all here realize that serious thought an international affairs requires the widest range of reference that you can't just focus on one corner of the strategic realm, and you see his name, the authors line, you know you're about to get something with tremendous explanatory power, and with writings that go across the culture of the country and the arts. calling into account that annual fraud, the nobel peace prize -- [laughter] after they call it, nobody can ever say "nobel peace prize" again without saying so ironically. i'll turn it over to them, and i think we'll start with elliot, if
people of blindness. now imagine entire washington metro area. about 3 million people. imagine all those people blind. now they can see. that's not -- that's not an obscure story. it's not an obscure story in the world of people. people know about the hospital. people travel from all over the world to go to the hospital to train to bring the same programs to their countries. it becomes a movement to end needless blindness. it's one example you might say that's -- got to be an exception. hundreds and hundreds of stories like that. and those are the stories that are transforming the global economy. not just the economy, societies building the future. >> so as you say in the next twenty years, 3 billion more people will enter to the world of economic freedom or another least -- >> right cognitive freedom. economic freedom. >> is the wild west does it need to be managed? how should it be managed? >> well,, you know, i like the core metaphor in describing the economy and the interaction of the economy and the society is reinforced. and when we go the rain forest whether it's the pacific north
this period of research was mike hertzog who had spent some time at the washington institute, and he served as chief of staff to ehud barak, and i put this question to him of how the israelis look out at the world and the lack of the, the weaknesses of the diplomatic side of their civil institutions. and he looked at me very straightforwardly and said we don't have american culture here. you should start with that. we are still in the process of developing civilian bodies, but for now the whole culture of decision making revolves around the military. it's as simple as that. in israel today the foreign ministry stands as the only bastion of israeli diplomacy. it is the house that sherrod built. yet the person who occupy os the sherrod chair of statesmanship and diplomacy is avision door lieberman who is not that interested in diplomacy, especially with the arabs, and if he had a policy, it is more than likely to abdicate the expulsion of arabs than engaging them. so to a great extent in the legacy of ben-gurion's organizational decade has made in israel the army as the country a civilianized
this stuff and a reporter from the florida newspaper hit out in the bushes in southwest washington and saw his girlfriend come in late at night and leave the next morning. it wasn't hard for him to guess she wasn't planning the floors or cooking and all night dinner and so you don't challenge the media and pretend to be something you aren't. >> political science professor, his most recent book is oops. observing the politicians stumble. how many books have you written and what are the topics? >> this is 17 of original books in the second editions and 27. i started out all academics have to do the time in the trenches during academic books and i've done textbooks the last five or six have been the more fun kind of books and the one prior to this high-profile all the books the presidents have mentioned in the state of the union message and today the president pointing out using someone as an example. that was not done until ronald reagan did it for the first time and the of used these people as an example of their protocol goals -- political goals and i did a biographee of brian lamb with ed
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)